Heirs to Our Oceans with Cambria Bartlett and Abirami Subramanian
April 27, 2021
heirs to our oceans

The world needs change. With an antiquated educational system, temperatures rising globally, and polluted oceans, the burden of change lies with all of us. Without our collective drive towards reformation, our youth are left to inherit the environmental mess from decades past.

On today’s podcast, I’m chatting with two high school students who are leaders of the non-profit organization, Heirs to Our Oceans. They educate their peers, take political action to save our oceans, and offer up their own solutions for educational reform.

Cambria Bartlett and Abirami Subramanian educate youth about the world they are inheriting and are empowering them to create a healthier, safer world for themselves and future generations.

About Cambria Bartlett and Abirami Subramanian:

As founding members of Heirs to Our Oceans (H2OO), Cambria Bartlett and Abirami Subramanian believe learning about real-world problems at an early age enables youth to start processing solutions and making positive environmental change while still in school. 

Cambria has given over 100 presentations about education, plastic pollution, and H2OO’s mission. She is a member of the United Nations Ocean Decade U.S. Youth Advisory Council and a leader in creating both H2OO’s Operation Global Sweep and Policy Advocacy Skill-Building Retreat. 

Abi’s advocacy has included presenting to schools (US, India, and Curacao) and lobbying to representatives in Congress, but her passion is spreading awareness through the medium of film. Currently, Abi is a member of the Bainbridge Island chapter of Citizens Climate Lobby (CCL), where she co-leads the social media team with her brother. She also volunteers at the Kitsap Immigrant Assistance Center (KIAC), using her filmmaking and social media skills for outbound marketing.

To learn more about Heirs to Our Oceans, visit their website and follow them on Instagram or Twitter.

Jump Through the Conversation

  • [1:45] Creating a movement to save our oceans and empower youth
  • [5:40] Addressing the lack of environmental education in schools
  • [8:50] Exploring the disconnect between students voices and the current educational model
  • [10:33] Inspiring reform through connection and purpose
  • [27:07] Cambria’s Magic Wand: Allowing youth to be empowered by the education system and develop skills to change the world. 
  • [28:01] Abi’s Magic Wand: Striking the balance between traditional subject matter and project-based, real-world learning.
  • [30:06] Maureen’s Take-Aways

Links and Resources:

Transcription:

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Hello fellow parents and educators. Thank you for joining me at Education Evolution, where we are disrupting the status quo in today’s learning models. We talk about present day education, what’s broken, who’s fixing it and how. I’m Dr. Maureen O’Shaughnessy, your host and founder of education, evolution and the micro school coalition, where we are fiercely committed to changing the narrative to reimagining the education landscape, and creating learning that serves all children and prepares them to thrive.

If you are new, welcome to the podcast. Please subscribe on our website to get it delivered to your inbox weekly. If you’ve been around a while, have you left a review?

Hi, Avi, and Cambria. So good to have you.

Heirs to Our Oceans
Great to be here today.

Thank you so much for having us.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Absolutely. And listeners. Today I’m chatting with two of the high school students who are leaders of the nonprofit organization, heirs to our oceans, Cambria Bartlett and Abi Subramanian, they are educating their peers and taking political action to save our oceans. Let’s hear how these amazing youth are making this happen. So Cambria, Abi, how did Heirs to Our Oceans get it start?

Heirs to Our Oceans
I can take this one. So about five years now actually, it’s crazy that we’ve been around this long. But it was just a group, a small group of youth around in my area in the Bay Area. And we got together because we really wanted to make a difference for our oceans. And our original idea was to make a documentary and then start bringing that to schools to bring more education. But as we started growing, we found just an upswell of youth that wanted to join our movement. So we started to do kind of more focused on that of building a movement of youth and providing them with more skills to make a change for our environment.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
I love that. And Avi, were you in the original group, too?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Yes, I was, it was truly an experience. And we’ve come so far from there. It’s really great to see.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Impressive, impressive, as so many people, whether they’re youth or adults, get ideas and are passionate about it. But taking action is super hard. And even when they take action, a lot of like new businesses and stuff fizzle out within a year and a ton within four years. So that you guys are in your fifth year. It just says a lot about your passion, your heart and your willingness to do hard work. So congratulations.

Heirs to Our Oceans
Thank you.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
So some of the students from my micro school attended your Youth Advocacy training, and it was impressive. Talk about how youth voices can make a difference. In legislation, you did a great job of empowering and inspiring. So tell us how can youth voices be bigger and make a difference with politicians out there?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Making change their policy has definitely been a big part of our straw oceans, even since our you know, starting years. Because you know, our voices do make a difference. Even though we can’t vote Yeah, it’s really important that they hear our perspectives. And we’ve made a lot of real world change by talking to policymakers. And so this youth policy advocacy retreat, it’s something that we have done for a couple years now, this is definitely our biggest one for sure. But it’s just preparing you to get those girls to talk to policymakers, because it’s an intimidating job talking to a policymaker, it’s pretty scary at first. So we really want to be giving you these real world skills so that they can go out and make the change that they wanted to see.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
I love that good for you guys. And and you’re not just settling for training youth to be political activists. Tell us about Hill day.

Heirs to Our Oceans
Oh, yeah. So Hill Day is basically when a big group of people go to Capitol Hill. And we talked to a bunch of different Congress persons about different bills that are on the table that we want them to support for our generation. We have done this every year or multiple times a year, federally as well as in our local states. And people have talked to their policymakers internationally as well. But it’s a way for us to get together and talk to policymakers as a group.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Really liked that you actually had some aides and politicians at your training and that they were sharing how important youth voice is and, and some pointers and kind of encouraging your voice and for you guys to make that happen and create those opportunities is powerful. And I know it’s scary, I am wanting to play bigger in terms of making school change. So get ready for a summit that’s coming up. I’ve been talking to state politicians in the state board of education. And I’ve been at this a long time, and it’s still scary for me too. So good job, you guys. That’s great. Your documentary youth misinformed is so powerful. And the I love that it started out in the Olympics. It’s like, Oh, that’s our backyard, that and then with your narrative and your panning of how beautiful our environment is. And we’re all starting to become aware of the many stories that we’ve mistakenly believed. So I’d love to hear about how you guys created this powerful film and and what kind of impact is it having?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Yeah, so this film began, in seal, the camp that Heirs to Our Oceans has hosted for a couple of years. Since it was virtual aerostructures decided to make it into a chance for us to create a film at the end, there was a whole training process, where the youth is part of the camp, were able to see how to make a film. And we had a filmmaker there who gave us tips and tricks. And at the very end, we were all split off into teams to make our own films about our environment, and youth and where we are. So my group decided to make a documentary on climate misinformation and lack of education, especially targeting our education system, we feel that our education system is not teaching us what we need to know, especially just targeting climate in our film, what we need to know for the future. And so that’s kind of where the idea sprung from. And we moved from there.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
And has anybody seen it? Have you gotten any feedback on it? I am completely impressed. But what kind of an impact is it having?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Yeah, it’s it’s done really well, we’ve gotten a couple of awards for it, it was submitted to a couple of film festivals. And when I’m just talking, I’m part of another organization as well called citizens climate lobby, it’s a little bit local to where I live, which is Bainbridge Island. And so it’s become a really great talking point, as youth of the next generation, and the youth of the next generation. And showing that I’m able to do this, and you all can do this as well. And also, this is such a pressing issue right now that we need to solve. And people seem to really take to it and really love it.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
I’m really impressed that you’ve identified the need. And I think we’re all becoming aware that our education is incomplete and incorrect in many ways. I know the Black Lives Matters, movement, we’re all struggling, oh my gosh, privilege, racism, colonial education, yikes. So for you to be saying, whoa, wait, there is a lack of information, or the information we’re getting is incorrect. And here, we’re going to fill in these gaps, you’ve identified a problem, and you’ve created a solution. And then you have this documentary, which is so powerful, you’re already a part of shifting this institution, it seems to me to another part of education not working is that we don’t really listen to your voices, or aligned with your passions and purpose. And I know that’s a part of airstar oceans really connecting to purpose. It seems like we’re like, Hey, here’s the textbook, you’re going to learn it students, and then you’re going to tell us what you learned. So it feels like we’re maybe missing the boat, and not even giving you guys what you need. And I think a lot of kids are disconnected. Are you finding broader than environmental education that that the school model from over 100 years ago is maybe not something that resonates with you, too?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Yeah, I totally agree with what you’re saying. I think there’s a huge lack of connection to building skills to solve real world problems. And also, just like, we aren’t seeing a lot of youth coming out of the education system we have right now very empowered. And I think that is what it should be. It should be focusing on empowering youth and giving them to skills that are actually going to help them function in the world and make a change.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
relevance, I hear kids say that all the time, when would we ever use this and, and content is just memorizing you guys with your smartphones can look things up in an instant, but context can you apply it? Do you understand how it connects into anything? Does it have any real world application at all? So yes, I think we need to be thinking skills, relevance, and you all being empowered. So your documentary is, is one example of how we can be doing this so much better and look at the results you guys got. That’s totally impressive. So talking about learning better when we have a voice in our learning, it ended aligning with our passions and purpose, I see that your air star oceans mission is to inspire the next generation of leaders by connecting them connecting them to their purpose. And this is so profound, what would you guys each say is your purpose? Do you have a sense of that?

Heirs to Our Oceans
You can go first Cambria.

All right. Well, that’s a big question.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
I know and it’s changes. But right now as a high school student, if you had one purpose, that you’re striving towards knowing that it’s going to change and evolve as life goes on, what do you feel like right now? You’re trying to get done? That matters a lot to you?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Well, I mean, working with airstar oceans has definitely given me a sense of purpose. And, you know, we had so many successes. And I think one of the most inspiring things to me to see is just see you coming out of you know, the summit’s, we host our son for empowerment, action and leadership that we host every summer workshops that build skills, like the policy advocacy retreat to see youth kind of have a sense of empowerment coming out of that is what really inspires me, and I hope that I contribute to that, and I have purpose in that as well.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Abi, how about you?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Um, it’s a pretty big question, as Cambria said, but I think I can speak to it as it just in terms of personal passion. Here. I’ve had a passion for animals since I was a child. And I kind of saw the world is a perfect place with all sorts of species coexisting with one another equally. And through air, stroke, oceans, and other organizations and my learnings have grown to see that these animals that I’ve been really passionate about, I’m facing so many issues that many of them are manmade. And so one of my goals from from when I was really young child was I always wanted to be a voice for the animals, since they do not have a voice and they can’t speak. And air sir oceans as previous David has been a really big part of giving me a means to fulfill that purpose, along with my peers, who have similar purposes to mine.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
I love that. And I know that purpose isn’t enough. And that’s where airstar oceans is really going further. And on your website, you talk about world crises and the skills needed to address these. So what do you see as a couple of world crises? And what are some skills that your trainings are using? Or your What are you providing to empower youth?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Well, like I said before, like a big focus of ours is our summits and our skill building workshops. That’s where, you know, we were giving to the youth the most at our biggest event is definitely seal, which stands for summit for empowerment, action and leadership. And there’s a time to bring together youth internationally, to develop skills together to work together to make films like it was focused on last year and to learn from each other. So that’s definitely how we take a lot of our action as well, as you know, applying those skills. We bring these films to the world, we go and talk to our congress persons and do presentations and all of that.

Yeah, kind of what we discussed in the film with project based learning, really getting out into the field. And as Cambria said, talking with our Congress, persons, legislators and, and other people in that field. And our biggest problems, we have such huge problems, such as climate change image in the film, ocean acidification, whatnot, and so really helping our own generation, understand biological systems understand the connections between humans, and these issues is terribly important. So project based learning and what errors is doing is a really great means of doing that.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
I agree, we all learn better when we get to experience. And I know when we’re taught that we all shut down. And by high school, many kids are completely disengaged, because they’re taught that and they’ll memorize and spit it out on a test and get a grade. They know how to do school. But that doesn’t mean they’re going to know how to do life. And when it’s project based, and you have a voice and what those projects are and you’re experiencing things. That’s the real world peace. So I completely agree, project based and getting out and getting to do internships and passion projects. And making those connections is the direction education needs to go for it to be meaningful for you guys. Cambrie I want to back up just a little bit. So I know we’ll have links in the show notes that we’ll talk about, you know where to find some of the reasons sources that you’ve mentioned, can you tell us who could be involved in steel? And how much it costs? And where could they find out more on that?

Heirs to Our Oceans
So how do we involve in feel we, so far, we’re doing it once a year, because that’s our capacity at the moment. And we always have applications open on our page. And I think last year, it ended up that three fourths of our youth got a full scholarship, because we really want to make sure that everyone no matter their position is able to have these opportunities. So that’s a big focus for seal is fundraising for these scholarships.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Good for you. I know my microscope is sliding scale tuition, because socio economic diversity and inclusion is so important, so good for you for making this affordable. And I encourage any youth or parents of youth that are listening to please look into this, because it would be an amazing opportunity for this summer. Yeah. And

Heirs to Our Oceans
If you look on our website, we always have a bunch of skill building workshops coming up, the policy advocacy retreat was our most recent one, but we always have more, and they are all free for you.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Amazing. That is such a cool resource. I know you guys are going to be leading the intergenerational imagination day on June 22, at our active summit, and you’ll be working with for learning and youth by youth in this day is going to help us create community and commit across the generations to being educational activists. So I just wanted to do a shout out. I’m so glad that you guys are taking your leadership and sharing it with us at our summit. Besides that unseal this summer, what else is next for airstar oceans?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Well, a big thing is,in June, we are putting together a oceans week where we are going to be talking to us policymakers, which is one of the reasons that we did the policy advocacy retreat is to prepare you for that. That’s the next big thing I can think of. But there’s always stuff coming up.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
That sounds really important. And I think that with younger politicians being elected right now, and with youth, whether it’s protesting or whatnot, I think that legislators are, if they weren’t, before starting to really understand that your voice and your vision are have been a missing part and are very needed part in making their legislative decisions. So good for you. I look forward to hearing how that goes. I’m going to shift it. And I’d love just for us to get to know the people behind the amazing work that you’re doing. So I am turbo time, and just some rapid fire questions to kind of know more about the two of you. So what is your favorite subject in school?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Well go first, my favorite subject is math, especially math theory. And it just, it just fascinates me that simplest way you can say it. And I really love writing papers about math. Just working out problems is something that I love to do. And that’s the one thing I’m able to pursue with environmental movement. And one thing I see with math as well, I think I think my favorite subject is probably science, I’ve had a lot of opportunities to do that in a project based way. And that’s just what I love about it the most I can really see it applying to the real world and what I’m learning. Yeah.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
So what careers might you want to pursue?

Heirs to Our Oceans
I can start, I don’t know, but I have thought a lot about potentially doing something as a teacher or some way to, you know, make a difference for youth.

I’ll go next, one of my dreams is to work on solutions to our climate problem. And over time with EHRs and other organizations, I’ve been able to understand like behaviors of biological systems. And I also have a fascination with engineering and programming. So I kind of want to combine these two. And so I’m kind of looking at like geo engineering or biomedical engineering as ways to help solve these problems.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Good for both of you. How fun. How about inspirational folks, whether it’s throughout history or even fictitious, that you’d love to meet?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Oh, go first. I have two or three. Should I just say one word? Two or Nope.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
However many you want.

Heirs to Our Oceans
Okay, so both these people a little bit more like recently popular just because of what’s been happening with the pandemic, but the first person is Rachel Wollensky. She’s the director of the Center for Disease Control and I just want to ask her about her experiences with helping control this pandemic. I know she is a mom. And so balancing her like work life, and home life right now must also be a really big experience for her. So, yeah, also a young man named Avi schiffman. And his, I think, his friend, Daniel Kahneman, who pretty recently created a website that shows live data about our COVID pandemic, and it updates really frequently. And as I said, Before, I really love engineering and programming. And so I kind of want to ask both of them about their learnings while engineering the software’s they did, as well as like any tips for someone like me, who’s you know, more on the beginner side?

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
And talk about real world application of their skills? It doesn’t get any more real than that. Faculty?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Yeah, I can take a little more out of the box answer to this. But I think that people that inspire me most is just the people that are around me and their heirs. I’ve met so many inspiring youth, and they’re just everywhere. You know, there’s a lot of kids doing a lot of amazing, amazing things. And just seeing them take action is what inspires me.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Love it. What is the biggest thing you wish folks knew about youth activism,

Heirs to Our Oceans
I wish that there was more recognition of how much we can make a difference. You know, I’ve unfortunately seen a lot of tokenization of youth during my time as an activist, and I suppose there’s more recognition of the amount of stuff that we can get done. And, yeah, we can do a lot.

For me, just talking personally, your activism has provided me with a really big opportunity to educate myself about the world around me. And this is a way of education that I would not have had without it. And so researching about different matters relating to our environment, has been really key in this. And I’ve been using the research that I’ve done with illustrations, for example, to run by myself, using that research and also gain an understanding of the world around me using my past experiences. And so in this way, youth activism has been really key in shaping my own perspective of the world, and growing, and I feel that all youth should have this opportunity as well, you that do them, it’s not really what I do. It’s more of who I am at this point. And it’s just really important to me in that way.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
I appreciate that distinction, that it’s really a part of your identity and not an activity. I think you both it’s totally a part of your identities and how you show up in the world. And lucky for us that that? What’s a favorite thing or fun fact about our environment?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Well, I was doing some research for a paper on Orca intelligence. And one thing I learned about is that orcas actually have their own different dialects. So yeah, it’s really cool. So there are many different like Orca populations around the world. And you can also call these populations eco types, which means that they’re defined as like subordinate divisions of a species that are like adapted to a certain habitat. And so orcas species are actually split up into like 10 different eco types. And each one of these eco types have their own dialect or language that they use to communicate between themselves. So I thought that was really amazing. I never need that.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
That is amazing, huh?

Heirs to Our Oceans
I love that fact I’ll be that’s super fun. I’ve one little like a little less fun than that. Sad, but a lot of live done, I focused a lot on plastic pollution in my time with errors and raising awareness about that. And within that, I am trying to bring up as much as possible and bring more awareness to the fact that plastics contribute to climate change. And that’s a huge issue that’s beyond just the plastics getting into the environment. And that’s something that I really have been focusing on raising more awareness about.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Yeah, yeah. That’s big, good for you. What’s something positive that’s come out of this horrible, crazy COVID time?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Well, it’s definitely been those two things horrible. I’m crazy. But I think one thing for me that has come out of it that is positive is, you know, with being more used to doing a lot of things virtually, I think we’ve seen the ability to connect, and we’ve been able to connect and globally more easily than ever, I think, you know, with all our summits, they used to be all of them used to be in person. And so though that is amazing, and there’s nothing that can really compare to the connection that you can get when you’re physically in a place with someone. Hmm, I think I’ve also seen the ability to connect even more youth you know, we can have a lot more people virtually, and I hope that moving forward, were able to, you know, combine those two incredible Being together and having experience together is different. But I also hope that we can have some stuff virtually to make sure that all youth are included in this even if they don’t have the ability to travel.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Yes,

Heirs to Our Oceans
We think that’s so important Cambria mine is actually more in personal based. And it’s in terms of filmmaking, I’ve been able to be involved with a local organization called kits up immigrant Assistance Center, it’s pretty near to where I live. And they have been giving COVID vaccines to immigrants, and people who are not able to get health care as easily. And so I’ve been able to document footage for them as part of this whole pandemic. And so it’s been really horrible this, but it’s also given me an opportunity to see how these people work and what they do. And that’s been truly amazing for me.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Wow, that sounds really powerful lobby. Last turbo time question, what is something that most folks don’t know about each of you?

Heirs to Our Oceans
Oh, that’s a good question.

I guess quite a few people know this about me. But it’s still a fun fact. And I’m sure the listeners don’t know yet. So I am an artist, and I really love painting. So that’s why I find it.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Very fun.

Heirs to Our Oceans
Just thinking, I guess I used to be really scared of bugs, like, a bit too scared. It was really bad. But then I went to this entomology class, and then now I love them. So yeah.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
In fact, I’ll be very fun. I like to wrap up our education, evolution podcast interviews with a question a magic wand moment. So in your documentary, youth misinformed, you cite the lack of education and misinformation in our schools, as we had talked about, and you state there’s a dire need for change in our education system. So grabbing that magic wand? What would learning look like in our schools? If you could wave that wand and make them any way possible? We’ve hinted but go ahead and dive a little deeper into it.

Heirs to Our Oceans
I think Well, yeah, we’ve handed out a lot of things, I think, most importantly, is giving opportunities for youth to be empowered by their education system, and given the skills to make a change in the world and more project based education and peer to peer education. And I’ll say that that was a lot of fun. Yeah, real world, things that they can connect and apply to their life that empower them and is what they want to learn.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
Cambria. That’s so amazing. And, and when we get out of your way, look what you guys are doing. So everything you say it’s like, check, check, check. Thank you, Abby,

Heirs to Our Oceans
I really think that there’s a if I were to wave the magic wand, as kind of tied to what Cambria said, there’s like a balance that needs to be struck. I think the subjects that are taught in schools right now are, are necessary. And they’re amazing, but they need to be balanced out with something that is also project based, where students and youth my age are able to go out into the environment, and solve real world problems. So integrating both of those is I think it’s going to be a pretty difficult task at first, but it’s definitely possible. And it’s for the better.

And I’ll I’ll add on a little bit to that, because that just made me think of how, yeah, the subjects we’re learning in school, they’re important. But there’s also ways to, you know, tie what we already have into projects, you know, there’s way to tie science into letting us to do a project they want to do that’s going to apply to the real world, there’s ways to make English have to do with papers that they can promote, you know, and bring out into the world and make an actual change with that. And so I think there’s ways to tie in the systems that we have with bringing more empowerment and project based and real world situations.

I want to add on to that one. But my school is actually using the UN Sustainable Development Goals. I felt like this is like a relatively good example. And they’re using them, especially my English class. We’re writing about them, we’re presenting about them. And we’re tying real world issues that are going on right now to our projects. And so I think just the Sustainable Development Goals are a really great way to get youth involved with real world issues like my class, for example.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
I completely agree you guys are nailing it. So Cambria and an Abi thank you for caring enough to do the hard work of being environmental and humanitarian activists for change. And thank you for spreading the word and being guests on education evolution today.

Heirs to Our Oceans
Thank you so much for this opportunity.

Thank you so much for having us.

Maureen O’Shaughnessy
When learning organizations, like Eris to our oceans, provide mentors and opportunities, our students step up and do the learning. This is how all schools could look, teachers as mentors and coaches, guiding versus lecturing, trusting students to ask tough questions, and take the lead. This is the empowerment, Cambria mentions that we need in our schools. And once students are engaged with topics of passion and a sense of purpose, then mentors can help provide opportunities to build skills in life right now we need transferable skills to prepare for the unknown future. Look at how Avi gained filmmaking skills from creating the documentary, which is 10 minutes of learning that I encourage all of you to go to our show notes and click on You’ll be impressed by the message in the delivery. And Avi didn’t stop with his award winning documentary. She’s now using her skills to help the Kitsap immigrant Assistance Center document it’s important work, empowerment and skill building, and activism. Let’s be sure that students know the issues and have ways for their voices to be heard. Participation in this summer’s annual two week intensive summit for empowerment, action and leadership. s EA l aerostar. Oceans seal program is a great place for many youth to start. Hats off to the mentors of errs to our oceans, and their amazing empowered youth leaders. I can’t wait to hear more from them on the intergenerational imagination day in our June at active summit. See the show note links for more information. As always listeners, thank you for being a part of the education evolution.

I know how challenging it is to make changes inside your own school or community. I’ve spent years working with schools around the world on creating learner centered programs. And it always struck me how much schools were able to get done with the right tools and guidance. If you’re ready to make changes like this in your own school, let’s talk and put together an action plan. Visit education evolution.org backslash consult for a free 15 minute call. And let’s see if we’re a good fit for more work together.

Education evolution listeners, you are the ones to ensure we create classrooms where each student is seen, heard, valued and thriving. We need you. Let’s go out and reach every student today.

I’d be so grateful if you’d head over to your podcast app to give a great rating and review if you found this episode valuable. Don’t wait. Please do it right now before you forget. I really appreciate it.

Thank you for listening, signing off. I am Maureen O’Shaughnessy, your partner in boldly reimagining education

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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What Your Teachers Need and Can’t Tell You with Melina Palmer

You have to make so many decisions every day as an educator or educational leader. It’s overwhelming and enough to drive you to burnout. Add to that the change that happens seemingly every minute in the classroom or the office. We can’t train on how to manage our...

Latest Blog Posts

Why Isn’t Educational Change Happening?

School change is so much harder than I thought! When I did my doctoral research on school innovation and created a hands-on learning school-within-a-school in the 90s, I had no idea that I’d spend the next few decades making tiny changes. Changes that often...

Instilling a Practice of Gratitude in Uncertain Times

Thanksgiving looks different this year. Traditions are being shattered in 2020 and new realities are emerging. Thanksgiving is no exception. After Canada’s Thanksgiving in October, COVID statistics jumped, reminding us that, sadly, the pandemic isn’t taking a break...

Building Interdisciplinary Learning into Traditional Classrooms

A traditional classroom setting is just that...traditional. Teachers must teach specific subjects for a required amount of time, often using prescribed curriculum materials that may be a decade old. There’s little consideration for the individual learner--their...

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